What year did the Mormon pioneers come to Utah?

Completing a treacherous thousand-mile exodus, an ill and exhausted Brigham Young and fellow members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints arrived in Utah’s Great Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847. The Mormon pioneers viewed their arrival as the founding of a Mormon homeland, hence Pioneer Day.

When did the Mormon migration to Utah start?

Young, and 148 Mormons, crossed into the Great Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847. For the next two decades, wagon trains bearing thousands of Mormon immigrants followed Young’s westward trail. By 1896, when Utah was granted statehood, the church had more than 250,000 members, most living in Utah.

When did the Mormon Trail start and end?

Learn about the Mormon Trail at the California Trail Interpretive Center. This journey for these immigrants began in 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois, and ended in Salt Lake City, Utah.

What year did the Mormon pioneers start their journey?

On April 16, 1847, a group of 148 Latter-day Saints in 72 wagons left Nebraska and began the 1,031-mile journey to the Salt Lake Valley.

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How long did it take the Mormon pioneers to reach Utah?

The Mormon Trail is the 1,300-mile (2,100 km) long route from Illinois to Utah that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints traveled for 3 months.

Who founded the Mormon Church?

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), also called Mormonism, church that traces its origins to a religion founded by Joseph Smith in the United States in 1830.

Where did the Mormon pioneers come from?

The Mormon pioneers were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), also known as Latter-day Saints, who migrated beginning in the mid-1840s across the United States from the Midwest to the Salt Lake Valley in what is today the U.S. state of Utah.

Who founded the Mormon Trail?

Smith’s successor, Brigham Young, proposed a 1,300-mile (2,100-km) exodus to the west. Beginning in 1846, thousands of Mormons traversed a route that would later be called the Mormon Trail. Following existing pioneer trails through Iowa, the group established winter quarters in Omaha, Nebraska.

How many miles a day did the Mormon pioneers travel?

Average distance covered in a day was usually fifteen miles, but on a good day twenty could be traveled. 7:30 am: Men ride ahead on horses with shovels to clear out a path, if needed. “Nooning Time”: Animals and people stop to eat, drink and rest.

Did Mormon pioneers travel on Sunday?

“Each Saturday night we were to pitch what tents we had and prepare our camps for rest on the Sabbath,” noted Wilford Woodruff in April 1847. But sometimes travel on Sunday was necessary: “Started before breakfast for the want of wood and water,” Eliza R. Snow noted on August 23, 1846.

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How did the pioneers get to Utah?

The period of overland emigration of the Mormon pioneers is generally defined as 1847 through 1868. That is when organized companies traveled to Utah by wagon or handcart. After the transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, Latter-day Saint emigrants who traveled to Utah generally came by train.

How far did Mormon pioneers walk?

The original 1846-1847 Mormon Trail went from Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois to Omaha, Douglas, Nebraska, to Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. The length of the wagon trail from Nauvoo to Salt Lake City was about 1,300 mile (2,092 km).

How many pioneers died coming to Utah?

Bashore and Tolley analyzed 56,000 records of pioneers who traveled to Salt Lake City between 1847 and 1868. The researchers found 1,900 deaths during the journey or within the calendar year of arrival in Salt Lake, making the overall mortality rate 3.5 percent.

How many Mormon pioneers died on the trail?

Bashore worked with a team of actuarial scientists at Brigham Young University to analyze 56,000 pioneer records from 1847-1868. Of these 56,000, there were an estimated 1,900 people who died either on the plains or within the calendar year of their arrival.